Have a Look at the Loring Style Tiny Home and Plans


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Designed as a very tiny bungalow, this design comes with several options to suit your needs. You can choose between a sleeping loft upstairs, or a cathedral ceiling. We also have a smaller version without the downstairs bedroom at the back of the house (See plan 915-9). Designed with simplicity in mind, this home has an abundance of light, and yet is very simply designed. The kitchen maximizes space and includes a dishwasher, full size range with oven, and built in microwave. The tank-less on demand water heater ensures that you never run out of hot water, and tucks away completely out of view. A small fireplace is tucked nicely in the corner of the great room. The smaller version has a washer/dryer combo in the kitchen, whereas the larger version has a stack-able washer and dryer closet. We don't count the loft as square footage in this house because with so much sloped ceiling, it doesn't officially qualify as a habitable room.

Included with the set of plans --

• Floor Plans: Detailed floor plans for both the downstairs and loft include pertinent dimensions for: walls, windows, rooms and door openings. You'll also find the location of all appliances on these plans as well.

• Exterior Elevations: These plans include 4 elevation drawings showing the front, back and both sides. Siding and facia boards are called out.

• Electric Plans: These pages include both the main floor and loft and show locations for outlets, light switches and lights.

• Transverse Section: Perhaps one of the most important pages on any set of plans, the transverse section cuts the house in half and shows details such as wall thickness, roofing material details, flooring details, roof pitch, ceiling heights, and insulation.

• Foundation Plan: Included is the floor framing, showing the exact location of each joist and calling out pressure treated joists as needed.

And more...

In most towns, a building permit isn't required for a structure of 120 square feet or less. However, these small structures are considered sheds or workshops. Full-time living in a tiny building is generally not allowed. Some people live successfully "under the radar" but it's risky. A grumpy neighbor or diligent official could make your tiny life untenable.

To be a legal residence, a structure must be built in accordance with local building codes. Most states have adopted the International Residential Code for One- and Two- Family Dwellings. However, there is great diversity in the specific versions. Scroll down to see the US map. In addition to the IRC, a state, county or city may have additional codes that must be followed. Rare exceptions do exist. This book, No Building Codes, written in 2010 by Terry Herb, provides information on areas where building codes are absent or rarely enforced.

While the 2015 IRC has eliminated the requirement for a house to have at least one room of 120 square feet or more, states will need to adopt the new code in order for it to be effective. In addition, the IRC still contains other minimum size specifications that prove challenging: rooms (except for bathrooms and kitchens) must be 70 square feet, ceiling height must be 7 feet, etc. (additional code discussion). Accordingly, while it is possible for a tiny house to meet building codes, a house built on a foundation on its own land is more likely to be small (more than 400 square feet) rather than tiny. In addition, a building permit will probably be required.

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